Rimrock Photo Two Highline Trail

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"Ancient Sediments – 1.6 billion to 800 million years ago. The majority of the rocks forming the mountains of the Peace Park are the result of the deposition of sediments into an ancient inland sea that existed over 1600 million years ago during the middle Proterozoic Era. The ancient Belt Sea covered parts of present-day eastern Washington, northern Idaho, western Montana, and nearby areas in Canada. During the period of active deposition over 18,000 feet (5500 m) of sediment eroded from nearby highlands and were carried into the sea. Accumulation of sediment subsequently resulted in downwarping of the sea floor. Also, over time and as environmental conditions varied, a variety of different materials were eroded and washed into the Belt Sea. The result was alternating layers of sediments of differing composition. With time, and as the sediments accumulated, the heat and pressure created layers of quartzite, siltite, argillite, limestone, and dolomite. The sedimentary character of the rocks in Waterton-Glacier is clearly evident in the form of preserved mudcracks, ripples, and layers; the crystal structure of each formation has been slightly metamorphosed, creating what can accurately be called metasedimentary rock. The combined rock formations that occur in Waterton-Glacier are part of the Precambrian Belt Supergroup and are readily visible in the 33 percent of the park above treeline. Because of the age of these rock structures, no developed life forms are found as fossilized remains; instead only fossilized algae beds have been found." Above quote from from GNP Geology


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Photo number two of twenty five
of the Rimrock Section of Highline Trail


Last  stop before rimrock Sectioon of Highline Trail

Many hikers who have not read up on the Highline Trail come around the corner and come to a sudden stop. I have literally bumped into hikers in front of me. If you look to the left in this photo the gray line below the white arch of snow is the Going To Sun Road. I try my best to start this trail before the crowds hit Logan Pass.

This series of photos of the Rim Rock Section of the Highline Trail is done to give hikers a feel for the trail. Truthfully there are other sections of this trail that are trickier then here but hikers with height problems have turned around before reaching those parts of the Highline Trail. It is better to not come past the first point in this series if you feel you will have problems with the trail as the bottleneck that occurs here is a hazard in and of itself.

Just as over the years I have learned the hard way that I can't hike with fast hikers, those hikers with Acrophobia should not let their hiking partners force them to hike were they are not comfortable.

Sadly it is usually family groups were one member of the family has no understanding of Acrophobia who tries to embarrass the other party to continue were they do not feel safe.

Next pic number 3


"Ancient Sediments – 1.6 billion to 800 million years ago. The majority of the rocks forming the mountains of the Peace Park are the result of the deposition of sediments into an ancient inland sea that existed over 1600 million years ago during the middle Proterozoic Era. The ancient Belt Sea covered parts of present-day eastern Washington, northern Idaho, western Montana, and nearby areas in Canada. During the period of active deposition over 18,000 feet (5500 m) of sediment eroded from nearby highlands and were carried into the sea. Accumulation of sediment subsequently resulted in downwarping of the sea floor. Also, over time and as environmental conditions varied, a variety of different materials were eroded and washed into the Belt Sea. The result was alternating layers of sediments of differing composition. With time, and as the sediments accumulated, the heat and pressure created layers of quartzite, siltite, argillite, limestone, and dolomite. The sedimentary character of the rocks in Waterton-Glacier is clearly evident in the form of preserved mudcracks, ripples, and layers; the crystal structure of each formation has been slightly metamorphosed, creating what can accurately be called metasedimentary rock. The combined rock formations that occur in Waterton-Glacier are part of the Precambrian Belt Supergroup and are readily visible in the 33 percent of the park above treeline. Because of the age of these rock structures, no developed life forms are found as fossilized remains; instead only fossilized algae beds have been found." Above quote from from GNP Geology


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